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micdotcom:

Striking photos show the catastrophic flooding in Detroit

Part of metropolitan Detroit is in a total state of emergency, and barely anyone is paying attention.

Thunderstorms on Monday flooded major sections of the suburb of Warren, just miles from downtown Detroit. It’s pretty bad — in some places the water reached five feet high, while Warren Mayor Jim Fouts told WWJ Newsradio 950 that 1,000 cars had been abandoned to floodwater. Thousands of residents, as well as the city hall and police department, have flooded basements. One person has died and hundreds of others have been rescued by police in canoes.

"This is probably a 200-year rain. I’ve never seen anything like this." | Follow micdotcom

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
The prime minister of the Central African Republic and his cabinet have resigned.
Clashes in CAR are threatening last month’s ceasefire deal.
Libya’s congress has called for a UN-backed ceasefire.
Egypt signed a $3m per year lobbying contract to help keep the US-Egypt relationship on good footing.
Fighting along the border between Sudan and South Sudan is threatening to merge two conflicts.
Human Rights Watch says that atrocities in South Sudan amount to war crimes.
In photos: Gaza after the bombardment.
In Israel, to be anti-war is to be ostracized/vilified/threatened…
The cease-fire in Gaza has ended and not been renewed. Rockets were launched from Gaza and Israel has resumed airstrikes. Talks are not progressing in Cairo.
Atef Abu Saif’s eight day war diary from Gaza shows the minutiae of life under the shelling.
Amnesty International calls for an investigation into evidence that Israel is actively targeting health care workers.
Foreign Policy reports that European powers have drawn up a plan for a UN mission to oversee the end of the blockade on Gaza and the destruction of Hamas’ tunnel system.
A horrifying dispatch from the scene of a barrel bombing in Aleppo.
The Syrian civil war continues to threaten Lebanon.
ISIS stormed one of the Syrian government’s last bases in Raqqa.
President Obama has authorized limited airstrikes against ISIS in Iraq.
ISIS has trapped 50,000 Yazidis in the mountains of northwestern Iraq, creating a terrible humanitarian crisis. Who are the Yazidis?
Bahrain convicted nine opposition activists of “public security charges,” stripping them of citizenship.
Major General Harold Greene was killed in a green-on-blue attack in Afghanistan this week — the first US general officer to be killed in either the war in Iraq or Afghanistan.
The US system of tracking weapons shipments to Afghanistan is faulty — failing to the extent that it isn’t known how many weapons are missing.
An Indian soldier who accidentally crossed the border has been detained by Pakistan.
RFE/RL explains the ongoing conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia in the Nagorno-Karabakh region.
A female journalist has written a blunt and damning essay about her recent rape in Ukraine by a “Very Respected Journalist.”
"Has Russia invaded us yet?" — the slow invasion of Ukraine.
Russia bans food imports from the US and EU.
Edward Snowden has been given permission to stay in Russia for at least another three years.
Former Georgian president Mikhail Saakashvili is being prosecuted for human rights violations and abuse of power, but his allies (like Sen. John McCain) are standing by their man.
Two Khmer Rouge leaders have been sentenced to life in prison by the UN-backed tribunal in Cambodia.
The New York Times will now use the word “torture” to describe… well, torture.
Troop charity Move America Forward is outed by ProPublica for its fundraising fakery and funneling proceeds into PACs and political consulting firms.
Photo: Shejaiya neighborhood, Gaza City. A man enters his shattered home on a mostly destroyed street. August 7. Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

Photo: Shejaiya neighborhood, Gaza City. A man enters his shattered home on a mostly destroyed street. August 7. Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

fotojournalismus:

The Daily Life of the Uyghurs in Kashgar (July/August 2014)

China’s Muslim Uyghur ethnic group faces cultural and religious restrictions by the Chinese government. Getty Images photographer Kevin Frayer offers a rare glimpse into daily life in Kashgar following recent unrest. In the last week of July, nearly 100 people have been killed in Xinjiang Province in what authorities say is terrorism, but exiled Uyghur groups and human rights activists say the government’s repressive policies in Xinjiang have provoked unrest, a claim Beijing denies. Kashgar, where Getty photographer Kevin Frayer made these pictures, is at the heart of all this

Photos by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

June 25, 1938: FDR Signs the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938
On this day in 1938, Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), abolishing child labor and establishing the 40-hour work week, a national minimum wage, and “time and a half” overtime pay. This final piece of New Deal legislation has been amended over 20 times both to raise the minimum wage and extend the law’s protections to historically oppressed groups.Explore the Roosevelts’ lives with the site for Ken Burns’s upcoming film, The Roosevelts: An Intimate History.
Photo: "Glassworks. Midnight. Location: Indiana" 1908 Photo by Lewis W. Hine. Source: Library of Congress

pbsthisdayinhistory:

June 25, 1938: FDR Signs the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938

On this day in 1938, Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), abolishing child labor and establishing the 40-hour work week, a national minimum wage, and “time and a half” overtime pay. This final piece of New Deal legislation has been amended over 20 times both to raise the minimum wage and extend the law’s protections to historically oppressed groups.
Explore the Roosevelts’ lives with the site for Ken Burns’s upcoming film, The Roosevelts: An Intimate History.

Photo: "Glassworks. Midnight. Location: Indiana" 1908 Photo by Lewis W. Hine. Source: Library of Congress

micdotcom:

Police are getting more and more like the military, report finds

America’s police forces are becoming more and more militarized, and it’s costing money and lives.

A new report from the America Civil Liberties Union dives into the deployment of SWAT teams by local and state police agencies, and the results aren’t pretty. Out of 818 SWAT raids carried out in 11 states from 2010 to 2013, seven ended with civilians dying because of the raids. There were also 46 civilian injuries.

While SWAT teams were originally meant for riot control and active shooter situations, the study found that 62% of missions were actually drug searches, with 79% of raids involving private homes. Only 7% of raids lined up with how SWAT teams were intended to be used.

Read more | Follow micdotcom

aljazeeraamerica:

Reclaiming their image: College athletes sue NCAA for cut of profits

Darius Robinson is working on his image. He recently had a sleeve on his right arm finished at his favorite tattoo parlor near his alma mater, Clemson University, in South Carolina.
But until recently — when Robinson graduated and finished his college football career — his image was not entirely his own.
In order to receive a scholarship to play defensive back for the Tigers, Robinson said, he had to sign away his right to profit from his name, image or likeness. That stipulation is part of the guidelines for amateur athletes set forth by the NCAA.

Read more

aljazeeraamerica:

Reclaiming their image: College athletes sue NCAA for cut of profits

Darius Robinson is working on his image. He recently had a sleeve on his right arm finished at his favorite tattoo parlor near his alma mater, Clemson University, in South Carolina.

But until recently — when Robinson graduated and finished his college football career — his image was not entirely his own.

In order to receive a scholarship to play defensive back for the Tigers, Robinson said, he had to sign away his right to profit from his name, image or likeness. That stipulation is part of the guidelines for amateur athletes set forth by the NCAA.

Read more