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Showing 10 posts tagged rights

aljazeeraamerica:

McDonald’s feels heat over low wages

McDonald’s hasn’t raised employees’ hourly wages across the board, but it has taken note of the growing protest movement against low pay. Its latest stock filing, for 2013, shows the fast-food giant views campaigns for higher pay as one of a number of “risk factors” it will have to contend with in the near future.
Along with sorting out how it will continue its popular dollar menu, the cheapest eats on offer at the chain restaurant, McDonald’s wrote in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that “the impact of (wage) campaigns by labor organizations and activists, including through the use of social media and other communications and applications,” could pose a threat to the global fast-food brand.

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(Photo: Richard Drew/AP)

aljazeeraamerica:

McDonald’s feels heat over low wages

McDonald’s hasn’t raised employees’ hourly wages across the board, but it has taken note of the growing protest movement against low pay. Its latest stock filing, for 2013, shows the fast-food giant views campaigns for higher pay as one of a number of “risk factors” it will have to contend with in the near future.

Along with sorting out how it will continue its popular dollar menu, the cheapest eats on offer at the chain restaurant, McDonald’s wrote in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that “the impact of (wage) campaigns by labor organizations and activists, including through the use of social media and other communications and applications,” could pose a threat to the global fast-food brand.

Read more

(Photo: Richard Drew/AP)

Al Jazeera English: Feature: Where a moustache can mean life or death

http://aljazeera.tumblr.com/post/60647402721/feature-where-a-moustache-can-mean-life-or-death

aljazeera:

Easily identified by trademark facial hair, Kakai Kurds in northern Iraq live under constant threat.

image

”The soul needs to reincarnate a thousand times before becoming one with god,” says Rajab Assy Karim from Ali Saray, 190 kilometres north of Baghdad. Iraq is full of “shortcuts” to the…

fotojournalismus:

Bangladeshi family members and supporters look at a photographic installation of portraits of garment workers on the three-month anniversary of the collapse of a nine-story building collapse in Savar, on the outskirts of Dhaka on July 24, 2013. Hundreds of garment workers staged demonstrations at the site of Bangladesh’s worst industrial disaster, demanding compensation for the survivors and a full account of the missing labourers of the April 24, 2013 factory building collapse that killed 1,129 people.
[Credit : Munir uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images]

We’ll see you on Tuesday night for our new episode, “Made In Bangladesh” about factory conditions and U.S. supply chains. 

fotojournalismus:

Bangladeshi family members and supporters look at a photographic installation of portraits of garment workers on the three-month anniversary of the collapse of a nine-story building collapse in Savar, on the outskirts of Dhaka on July 24, 2013. Hundreds of garment workers staged demonstrations at the site of Bangladesh’s worst industrial disaster, demanding compensation for the survivors and a full account of the missing labourers of the April 24, 2013 factory building collapse that killed 1,129 people.

[Credit : Munir uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images]

We’ll see you on Tuesday night for our new episode, “Made In Bangladesh” about factory conditions and U.S. supply chains. 

What I’m asking is that you do not yield to a simple narrative about Texas again: that it is only a big, ugly, prideful, backward, unmovable place. This is an easy story to tell, but it’s one that intelligent, attentive people all over the world tell anyway. What I’m asking is that you do not yield to the truly ugly things about Texas—Kimberly McCarthy’s execution, whatever Rick Perry says today, these inconceivable abortion measures that will pass anyway, the deep red of our electoral map, the fact that the happiest news of the week, the overturn of DOMA, doesn’t completely reach down here—to the extent that they fool you into forgetting the other things, the things that should now be evident. Wendy Davis, the sound of those women, the reemergence of a visible, fevered Texas Democratic party, the very real concerns of 26 million people who have been here all along.

I’ll Not Yield At This Time by Callie Collins, former associate editor of American Short Fiction (where I once spent a sweltering summer reading the slush) and the co-director of the very exciting new independent press, A Strange Object. (via therumpus)

We are all about not yielding to the simple narratives.  -KT

(via therumpus)

dynamicafrica:

fattysaid:

meenerhabi:

TW: Rape - Human Rights Watch’s report on sexual violence in Egypt

Egyptian anti-sexual harassment groups confirmed that mobs sexually assaulted and in some cases raped at least 91 women in Tahrir Square over four days of protests beginning on June 30, 2013 amid a climate of impunity.

Reports like these are imperative to finding a solution to the problem of sexual harassment in Egypt. The women speaking out about their attacks should be lauded for their bravery and those actively working on the ground to try and tackle this problem should also be praised for their efforts. The problem of sexual harassment in Egypt is very complicated but I have hope that things will get better in the future.

If you’d like more personal input about the situation in Egypt, you should all really be following fattysaid.

(via humanrightswatch)

Governor Rick Perry is calling the Texas Legislature back into session on July 1st for a second special session that will include the plan to close most of the abortion clinics in the state filibustered by Democratic State Senator Wendy Davis on Tuesday. 

Above, our August 2012 episode “The Abortion War" on anti-abortion violence and the trend of new laws proposed and passed restricting abortion and reproductive rights. 

More: Jessica Mason Pieklo on Rolling Stone on why Wendy Davis’ filibuster matters

In light of today’s SCOTUS decision on the Voting Rights Act, we’re watching our 2012 film, “Disenfranchised in America.” 

Fault Lines travels to Tennessee and Florida, two states that have passed strict laws, to explore the origins and consequences of the new legislation.

Who are the individuals that are at risk of not participating in the next election? What are groups doing to fight back? And could enough voters be disenfranchised in 2012 that it could have a significant impact on the outcome of the election?

Gold fever is sweeping across South America. Nowhere is it more lethal than in Colombia, where the gold rush has become a new axle in Colombia’s civil war. Turf wars are erupting between paramilitaries, and leftist rebel groups fighting to take control of mining regions. It’s fueling an old ideological conflict and has displacing hundreds of people.

Helicopter raids by the Colombian Army on small community mining collectives have become commonplace, and the Colombian government is accused of targeting poor workers to protect big business interests, and operating with impunity from human rights violations.

Thousands have fled their homes where land is violently contested, and others live in fear they’ll be removed from their land, arrested, or killed.

The multinationals are flooding in too. With gold now worth around $1,500 an ounce, everyone is getting in on the act, including North American mining companies. Colombia’s pro-business mentality has seen arbitrary concessions by the state sold to multinational companies, often on indigenous land.

Fault Lines traveled to Colombia to speak to the people caught in the middle. The rural workers and artisan miners who’ve mined for generations, and some whose ancestors were enslaved during the first gold rush centuries ago. Others are former coca farmers, put out of work by the US-led Plan Colombia.

First aired: Monday, July 4, 2011 2230 GMT on Al Jazeera English.

(Also, see the livetweets from the episode on @AJFaultLines @eliza19 and @joshrushing .)