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Politics, Religion and the Tea Party: What role does religion play in the US presidential elections?

http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/faultlines/2011/12/2011121093110983115.html

currenteye:

With a powerful Tea Party movement framing Republican policy in Washington and across the US, Fault Lines looks into the links between the Tea Party movement, the Christian conservative movement and Republican politics ahead of the GOP primaries.

As the race for the Republican presidential nomination for the 2012 elections heats up, Fault Lines follows the Iowa campaign trail to investigate the underlying forces shaping candidates’ strategies.

How have politics, religion and the far-right conservative movement reshaped the political landscape of the US?

Watch this episode of Fault Lines at Al Jazeera English

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(via abandonedcurrenteye-deactivated)

This Fault Lines episode first aired on Al Jazeera English 12 December 2011 at 2230 GMT. 

With a powerful Tea Party movement framing Republican policy in Washington and across the United States, Fault Lines looks into the links between the Tea Party movement, the Christian conservative movement, and Republican politics ahead of the GOP primaries.

As the race to be the Republican nominee in the 2012 Presidential election heats up, Fault lines follows the Iowa campaign trail, to understand how the far-right conservative movement is reshaping the American political debate, and to open a window onto the political landscape of the United States, its religious sensibilities, its fears, and possibly its future.

Bill Galston, political analyst at Washington think tank the Brookings Institution, said: “For a proportion of the US electorate, while the Tea Party represented an important reaction to a government that was seen to be going too far, it is also the case that the Tea Party itself has gone too far. It is a reaction against the reaction.”

Suddenly darlings of the right not America’s cup of tea,” Matt Williams, December 3, 2011. 

More than half of likely Republican caucus-goers (55 percent) say it is at least somewhat important a candidate share their religious beliefs, a figure that rises to 80 percent among white evangelicals. Eighty-five percent overall (including 77 percent of white evangelicals) say they would vote for a Mormon candidate, though just 67 percent say most people they know would vote for a Mormon. Both Romney and Jon Huntsman are Mormon.

"Newt Gingrich strong with Iowa evangelicals, Tea Partiers," CBS News and New York Times interview research, December 6, 2011